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Phoenix Elderly Caregiver Abuse Attorneys


We Know Phoenix Caregiver Abuse Law

As people age, they become less and less able to take care of themselves. It may start with just being unable to make it to the store on their own, but can quickly spiral into being unable to take their own medication, or even dress themselves. When this happens, they are faced with two options: move into a nursing home that has full-time staff, or stay in their own home and have someone come in to take care of their daily needs. Most often, the elderly prefer to stay in the comfort of their own home, and it’s most definitely the cheaper option in most cases. The problem with this is that caregiver abuse can sometimes happen.

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Where Does This Type of Abuse Take Place?

Caregiver abuse can happen in adult day care settings and nursing and retirement homes, too, but when caregivers are in someone else’s home, the abuse can be very difficult to spot. Most times, people just aren’t looking for this type of abuse, and often the people the elderly see throughout the day don’t even know that a caregiver is taking care of them. To worsen the problem, caregivers often don’t need to be certified, trained, or licensed and so, the elderly they care for become even more at risk.

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Arizona Law on Caregiver Abuse

But now, the state of Arizona has done something about the problem. Now, under state law, caregivers are required to provide full transparency to the people they care for, or those that hire them, such as the family of the elderly person that is to be cared for. In Arizona, caregivers who provide non-medical, in-home care must provide all information pertaining to their training, background checks, service costs, and hiring and firing policies. Not only must this information be provided upon the hiring of the caregiver, but the caregiver must provide it on a yearly basis, so that the elderly and their family can always be assured that they are receiving the best and most reliable care.

This still does not mean that in-home caregivers must be certified and/or licensed. Like most states, Arizona does not have a law regarding the actual training of caregivers. However, any caregiver providing services to the elderly must provide information pertaining to any training, or lack thereof, that they have had.

But how is this going to stop caregiver abuse?

The idea is that with the requirement to be completely transparent about their background, more quality in-home caregivers will be providing the elderly with support. It is less likely that the elderly and their families will hire caregivers that don’t have formal training or certifications and so, the caregiver will know how to deal with the stress of the job and other elements that can ultimately lead to caregiver abuse.

Sadly, this Arizona law does not guarantee that caregiver abuse will come to a stop altogether within the state. Caregiver abuse is still something that’s quite prevalent in Arizona, especially with approximately 600 in-home care agencies throughout the state.

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The Husband & Wife Law Team Offers Free Consultations

If you are a victim of caregiver abuse, or if you suspect a loved one is being abused by their caregiver, contact Breyer Law Offices, P.C. today. Caregiver abuse is a very serious offence and one of the saddest, considering it’s committed by someone you trusted the most. The Husband & Wife Law Team is here to help. We’ll review your case, take it to court when necessary, and fight to get you the compensation you deserve. Don’t wait another second. Call us at (602) 267-1280 today, and let our Phoenix elder abuse lawyers take care of it while you and your loved one start on the path of recovery you deserve.

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During a free consultation, we will look at the important aspects of your case, answer your questions, and explain your legal rights and options clearly. All submissions are confidentially reviewed by Mark Breyer.

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Confidentially reviewed by Attorney Mark Breyer